Home / Photographers / -By Location / New York & West Coast: Hoover Art, Mishkin, Phyfe_vlad [334]

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  • historicalzg - 1Reply
    profdash wrote on Nov 25, '09
    Hoover Art Studio was actually West Coast, and its chief photographer was Hendrick Sartov. After 1923 Sergis Alberts was the photographer. I give a capsule history of the studio in the posting "The Aesthetics of Soft Focus" on this site. http://historicalzg.piwigo.com/index?/category/105-hendrick_sartov_the_aesthetics_of_soft_focus_david

    ohikkoshi wrote on Nov 25, '09
    Thank you for the quick response.
    Added 5 portraits by Sergis Alberts and 2 by Sartov.

New York & West Coast: Hoover Art, Mishkin, Phyfe  Nov 25, '09 4:07 AM
by Vlad for group historicalziegfeld #176

Updated:

profdash wrote on Nov 25, '09
Hoover Art Studio was actually West Coast, and its chief photographer was Hendrick Sartov. After 1923 Sergis Alberts was the photographer. I give a capsule history of the studio in the posting "The Aesthetics of Soft Focus" on this site.

http://historicalzg.piwigo.com/index?/category/105-hendrick_sartov_the_aesthetics_of_soft_focus_david

ohikkoshi wrote on Nov 25, '09
Thank you for the quick response.
Added 5 portraits by Sergis Alberts and 2 by Sartov.

 

Hoover Art
Hendrick Sartov
Sergis Alberts
Time Period: 1910-1920 (?)
Location: West Coast

"Hoover Art Studio was actually West Coast, and its chief photographer was Hendrick Sartov. After 1923 Sergis Alberts was the photographer.
Hendrick Sartov, chief photographer of Hoover Art Studio in California, was the most artful of the pictorialist portrait photographers on the West Coast--with the exception of Edward Weston. A master print-maker, his images are the most collectible of 1910s Hollywood imagery. In the 1920s the majority of his effort was spent at cinematography, first for D. W. Griffith, then for other studios. He tinkered with lenses and lights and claimed to have been a lecturer in Physics in Germany before coming to the United States.”
© David S. Shields


Herman Mishkin
Time Period: 1890-1932
Location: 42nd & Fifth Avenue, New York City

“Herman Mishkin was the foremost portrayer of Golden Era opera singers. In certain respects, he had the most difficult task of any theatrical photographer of the early 20th century, for he was constantly having to temper the hyperbolically dramatic poses that opera singers employed on the vast stages of Europe and America so that they didn't appear ludicrous shot from twelve feet's distance. His subjects were among the least tractable persons to instruction in the performing arts, and were generally infected with decorative sensibilities. That Mishkin was able to satisfy his sitters and adjust to the increasingly less ornamental aesthetic of modern photography was a testament to his tact and flexibility. He began shooting CDVs and Cabinet portraits of performers in costume in the 1890s and closed his career in the 1930s by shooting singers in modern dress in contemporary settings. While shooting opera stars for the Met, he maintained a portrait studio frequented by most of the significant performing artists of the day. His portraits of actors and actresses display a refinement and composure sometimes lacking in the histrionic costumed opera images.”
© David S. Shields
http://broadway.cas.sc.edu/index.php?action=showPhotographer&id=62


Hal Phyfe
Time Period: 1926-1955
Location: Corner of 72nd & Madison Ave, NYC
“As adept at portraying men as women, Phyfe produced some of the most dynamic male portraits of the late 1920s. He preferred not to portray performers in costume. A master of middle grays, his exhibition and portfolio prints of the late 1920s display exquisitely refined shading. During the late 1920s he indulged in the penchant among NY portraitist to vignette heads. There would be strong graphic intervention at the perimeters of the image, suggesting a drawing. In the 1930s he opted for a straighter style of portraiture, full body, often with the subject seated. His Society portraits of the 1930s are well posed and understated, suggesting refinement rather than ostentation. His popularity among Hollywood performers derives from his disinclination to overstate elegance. He signed original prints in red crayon in distinctive squared letters. His Hollywood portraits are signed on the negative in white.”
© David S. Shields
http://broadway.cas.sc.edu/index.php?action=showPhotographer&id=48

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